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Unbelievably well-preserved precolumbian textiles from Peru.

1-2. Naza-Wari fusion epoch (800-1300 A.D.), woven feathers. 3-6 Moche-Wari fusion epoch (800-1300 A.D.), 7-8. Chincha (1300-1532 A.D.), these are the finest threaded textiles in the entire world, 398 threads per linear inch. 9-11. Paracas (800-100 B.C.) funerary mantles and shirt.

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru

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Pacopampa Stele
Formative Period (1250 B.C. - 1 A.D.) “Mother Goddess” Statue
Notable for her animalistic features and presentation of Vagina Dentata
From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Pacopampa Stele

Formative Period (1250 B.C. - 1 A.D.) “Mother Goddess” Statue

Notable for her animalistic features and presentation of Vagina Dentata

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

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Moche (100-800 A.D.) Sacrificial Cup and Tumi Knife.
The knife would slit the neck of the (often human) sacrificial victim while the blood would be collected in the goblet and drunk by Moche priests acting as Moche deities.
Pretty fucking metal.
From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Moche (100-800 A.D.) Sacrificial Cup and Tumi Knife.

The knife would slit the neck of the (often human) sacrificial victim while the blood would be collected in the goblet and drunk by Moche priests acting as Moche deities.

Pretty fucking metal.

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

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Murals from the interior of the Moche (100 A.D. - 800 A.D.) center of Huaca de la Luna in Trujillo, Peru.

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Three skulls exemplifying different forms of cranial modification and an infant mummy

Cranial modification was particularly notorious as it was used on the South Coast of Peru (Nazca, Paracas cultures) to express ethnic and other facets of the identity and affiliation of individuals. Cranial modification is the culmination of applying pressure to the skull of an infant, usually by impressing the head with a wooden board, and thus allowing the molded skull to develop into the desired shape as the individual matures. As the process was conducted in infancy, while the brain was still malleable, cranial modification did not lead to mental disabilities or bodily dysfunction.

The coast societies of Peru are organized in ways very different from the highlands. Whereas in the highlands communities were often economically self-sufficient based on a vertical archipelago in which a single community produced the entire plethora of necessary goods for societal equilibrium, the coasts of Peru instead opted towards a horizontal archipelago, where every community focused on a particular craft or method of subsistence which they would then export to their surrounding, dependent communities, and vice versa. On the north coast of Peru we know that the cultural gap between these communities was so pronounced that certain professions actually spoke completely different languages or dialects, as exemplified by the case of the Quingnam language, a language once spoken exclusively by north coast fishermen.

On the south coast of Peru the morphology of cranial modification seems to have been directly indicative of a person’s community and also their profession. Some communities would even modify the skulls of their citizens to resemble the peaks of the community’s local sacred mountain-deity, or apu.

If you reblog this and say anything about aliens I will find you and I will eat you.

From the Museo Arquelogico de Ancash in Huaraz, Peru.

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Chavin Culture (900-200 B.C.) Ceramic. A man covered in Chavin culture tattoos slits his own throat with a knife in his hand. You can see that the bones and veins in the neck-wound have been modeled painstakingly by the sculptor. The man’s neck is now upside-down and his face conveys an expression of tranquility in death. Possibly evidence for human sacrifice during the Chavin period, but the depiction of suicide here rather than ritualized homicide is quite unusual.

From the Museo Nacional de Chavin in Chavin, Peru.

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the-secret-team said: Psychonauts appealed to the sort of people I knew who, like some think rote recitation in public of whole bits from say, the Simpsons or Monty Python is a sign they have a great sense of humor, there was a newer generation of people who thought constantly quoting non-stop from the likes of Invader Zim or other sources of wacky cartoon humor for kids was instantly hilarious, that sort of Kid Cartoon humor that shades too easily into modern WACKY RANDOM ZANY LOL "humor".

jerkdouglas:

 Your average person doesn’t know just how hard an entertainer type works to be original… Learning new things is hard on a level that most of the glassy-eyed consumer audience can’t comprehend. It takes a lot of instinct, research and finesse to make people understand a new concept, humorous or otherwise.

 This is why when you go to hollywood you have to pitch things as, “It’s like THIS meets THIS.” I mean you have to start from ideas and concepts the paying parties can get their heads around.

 And it’s because of this that a lot of low rent entertainer types take that regurgitation/recitation/randumzany formula and run with it, because they know the general consumer population is still ripe for reuse of material, so they make their entire product along those lines, and then claim “homage” when people call them out for ripping things off. They know damn well it’s not a homage when the homages encompass the entire product.

 To put this into perspective, my retarded cousin makes lots of homages. All the time, to many television shows and movies, and I’d like to think I’m funnier than him, but then again, sometimes he puts a bucket on his head and runs into things. So he does in fact have unique talent I can appreciate, unlike my high-functioning competition.

I think the problem with creativity is that we, as human beings creating art, largely derive all of our ideas from cross-structuring. Putting two things you like together is actually a tried and true way of coming up with new ideas actually worth their salt. It’s very hard for us to just observe day-to-day life with its monotonies and social constrictions, or the natural world which is seemingly alien and often consistently escapes artistic attempts at coherent sui generis descriptions and convey it in art in a way that hasn’t been done before.

Instead when we take two existing creative entities we are already attempting to engage with the cultural conventions of art and our audience in a way that is interesting. This is largely why we can entertain ideas like art history and the development of pop culture, because ideas that stick aren’t just birthing fully original in the womb of an immaculate creator, they’re coming from somewhere.

I think the problem is weirdly one of having an eye for the geist of a thing, of knowing what to derive out of some concepts to produce something new and interesting. It’s sort of why we can have something like, say, Conan the Barbarian meets Evil Dead 2 and end up with Berserk, or in more general genre terms, Blaxploitation meets Spaghetti Western filtered through Tarantino’s style and end up with Django Unchained, and have these be original things we can all basically accept as being a quality concept, as opposed to say, Sonic meets Pikachu and ends up as Sonichu.

Frankly I think bad creatives are just really guilty of not reading/watching/listening to enough, or enough stuff that’s a matter of personal taste and off the general public’s radar, to come up with anything new. That’s why those irritating people keep quoting Monty Python or The Simpsons, that’s probably about all they really watch because society in general, or some insular circle-jerk of a fandom, has declared those things generally good and/or funny and so they can regurgitate it and expect a positive response based on the cultural consensus 9 times out of 10. Even if it’s actually only funny within an extremely culturally specific group of people who don’t mind dry repetition.

That’s also why humor for children is so laden with that sort of stuff. Children are probably the most culturally constricted market for entertainment there is. They haven’t been exposed to enough material to actually understand when something is dry and repetitive, and their consumption of art is usually restricted by the social taboos and quirks of their parents until they’re into their teens, so there’s less a need for creators to instill any sort of originality. That’s why you’ve got so many wonderful little stories throughout pop-culture of that day little Timmy decided to read that comic book mommy and daddy said he wasn’t supposed to read and it ended up an inspiration in his creative endeavors for the rest of his life.

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