Chimu elite head-dresses, nose-rings, and breast plates from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Along with a lackluster modern representation from the visitor’s center at Chan Chan.

15 notes

The Moche (100-850 A.D.) sacrifice monster slits the throat of a victim with a tumi knife.
Ceramic from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

The Moche (100-850 A.D.) sacrifice monster slits the throat of a victim with a tumi knife.

Ceramic from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

8 notes

Here we have possible reason to suspect that Clint Eastwood may end up a time traveler.
Moche ceramic portrait from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Here we have possible reason to suspect that Clint Eastwood may end up a time traveler.

Moche ceramic portrait from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

2 notes

Good News! It’s Terminal!
Moche (100-850 A.D.) ceramic vessel from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Good News! It’s Terminal!

Moche (100-850 A.D.) ceramic vessel from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

2 notes

One of the Lambayeque (750-1375 A.D.) deities peeks inside a box to satisfy his curiousity. Almost certainly some kind of recurring mythological motif.
Ceramic from the storage section of the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

One of the Lambayeque (750-1375 A.D.) deities peeks inside a box to satisfy his curiousity. Almost certainly some kind of recurring mythological motif.

Ceramic from the storage section of the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

2 notes

theenwhitenment:

karduniash:

This is a Sumerian macehead dating to the Early Dynastic III (2500-2330 B.C.). The macehead is inscribed with archaic Sumerian cuneiform which reads: “Mesalim, Lugal of Kish, builder of the temple of Ningirsu, established this for Ningirsu, Lugal-šag-engur was the Ensi of Lagaš.”
King Mesalim of the Third Dynasty of Kish is actually missing from the Sumerian King list but appears in our records as the mediator of a border dispute between the Sumerian city-states of Lagaš and Umma. A more thorough account of Mesalim’s presence in history can be read here: http://enenuru.net/html/sumerian_hist/mesalim.htm 

This is a mace head. Lol it prolly is but i can see some scientist naming shit just cause hes a scientist. Just walking around like that there was a tooth brush and that a comb and half the shits wrong.

What a penetratingly astute critique on the arbitrary nature of scientific epistemology. Shine on you cracker-ass honky!

theenwhitenment:

karduniash:

This is a Sumerian macehead dating to the Early Dynastic III (2500-2330 B.C.). The macehead is inscribed with archaic Sumerian cuneiform which reads: “Mesalim, Lugal of Kish, builder of the temple of Ningirsu, established this for Ningirsu, Lugal-šag-engur was the Ensi of Lagaš.”

King Mesalim of the Third Dynasty of Kish is actually missing from the Sumerian King list but appears in our records as the mediator of a border dispute between the Sumerian city-states of Lagaš and Umma. A more thorough account of Mesalim’s presence in history can be read here: http://enenuru.net/html/sumerian_hist/mesalim.htm

This is a mace head. Lol it prolly is but i can see some scientist naming shit just cause hes a scientist. Just walking around like that there was a tooth brush and that a comb and half the shits wrong.

What a penetratingly astute critique on the arbitrary nature of scientific epistemology. Shine on you cracker-ass honky!

45 notes

This summer I’ve been working on an archaeological project on the North Coast of Peru at the site of Huaca Colarada, a Moche period ceremonial center located out in the middle of a desert covered in roaming dunes. Huaca Colorada towers over the horizon as a huge mound of shell and red pot sherds sitting ominously in the distance. The locals all know Huaca Colorada to be an evil, haunted place. The huaca emits strange noises and the locals believe it devours people foolish enough to tread upon it. Given the macabre history of mass human sacrifice on the site, confirmed in our excavations, in which young women were brutally murdered, often dismembered, and buried into the structure’s walls and floors, such claims and warnings don’t seem without precedent.
The other day on the grueling dune-hike back from our prehistoric place of labor I noticed a peculiarly decorated sherd peeking out of one of the dunes. I drew closer and found this fragment, a mold design clearly depicting some sort of tentacle covered in circular indentations representing suction cups.
As far as I’m concerned this is indisputable evidence that the Precolumbian inhabitants of Peru’s north coast, in addition to the vampiric orgies attested by colonial Spaniard informants, were without question subscribers to the worldwide Cthulhu cult and its unspeakable rituals, now acknowledged as fact by several reputable ethnographers, archaeologists, and historians.

This summer I’ve been working on an archaeological project on the North Coast of Peru at the site of Huaca Colarada, a Moche period ceremonial center located out in the middle of a desert covered in roaming dunes. Huaca Colorada towers over the horizon as a huge mound of shell and red pot sherds sitting ominously in the distance. The locals all know Huaca Colorada to be an evil, haunted place. The huaca emits strange noises and the locals believe it devours people foolish enough to tread upon it. Given the macabre history of mass human sacrifice on the site, confirmed in our excavations, in which young women were brutally murdered, often dismembered, and buried into the structure’s walls and floors, such claims and warnings don’t seem without precedent.

The other day on the grueling dune-hike back from our prehistoric place of labor I noticed a peculiarly decorated sherd peeking out of one of the dunes. I drew closer and found this fragment, a mold design clearly depicting some sort of tentacle covered in circular indentations representing suction cups.

As far as I’m concerned this is indisputable evidence that the Precolumbian inhabitants of Peru’s north coast, in addition to the vampiric orgies attested by colonial Spaniard informants, were without question subscribers to the worldwide Cthulhu cult and its unspeakable rituals, now acknowledged as fact by several reputable ethnographers, archaeologists, and historians.

1 note

Mochica (100-800 A.D.) 

"Sacrificed victims fall from the mountains before the eyes of a deity."

Artifacts and Description from the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

11 notes

toothycat.jpg
Not sure which ancient Peruvian culture this is from, but I like it.
From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

toothycat.jpg

Not sure which ancient Peruvian culture this is from, but I like it.

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

5 notes

Mochica (100-800 A.D.) ceramic of a flayed man being eaten by a vulture.
From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

Mochica (100-800 A.D.) ceramic of a flayed man being eaten by a vulture.

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru.

5 notes